Click here to show or hide the menubar.
  • Barack Obama with his basketball team at the Punahou School in 1977.
  • 7) Europe, ex. Germany, is in recession. 10) Austerity is a means by which the rich can buy up assets which are not normally on the market for cheap. 19) Stirling Newberry says, and I agree, that none of this is stable, but it will last as long as the majority of the baby boom, the silents and a good chunk of the Xers still think they can hang on to their little piece of the pie, and screw everyone else. It will most likely break down in 2020/24, which is when the demographics turn. Young people today are completely screwed, they have astronomical student loans, no or shitty jobs, can’t afford a house and can’t afford to start a family. Note that the places where revolutions, peaceful or otherwise, are happening, are places where the majority of the population is young. Latin America, the Middle East.
  • The policy response to this has been fiscal contraction at a time of a liquidity trap. Hoping this will work and turn the economies to growth is like putting an anorexic on a diet and expecting her to put on weight.
  • ....But if we are saving and the Government is forced by law to save too, who will spend? And if no one spends, what happens to everyone’s income? And if everyone’s income is falling, what happens to austerity targets, which are expressed in terms of debt to income? As debt is expressed as a percentage of income, and income is falling while debt is fixed, it means the ratio is getting bigger rather than smaller.....
  • Germans should know that there are no free lunches, and the greatest free lunch of all was the belief that Germany could lock in a permanently cheaper exchange rate off which to export without a price. Of course, the quid pro quo of their huge trade surplus was massive inflows of money to Germany, which has to be spent somewhere. Had they their own currency, it would have risen in response to these inflows and German exports would have become very expensive. This didn’t happen, so Germany got turbo-charged export conditions, a massive current account surplus and huge financial exposure to its neighbours because German banks re-lent this cash to the periphery of Europe.
  • Although the paper gold price has been range-bound over the past month, the physical gold market has been undergoing staggering change. Earlier this month it was revealed that Hong Kong gold imports into China totaled nearly 40 tonnes in the month of February, representing a 13-fold increase over the same month last year (see Figure 2).22 40 tonnes annualized equates to 480 tonnes per year - a massive number in a market that only produced 2,810 tonnes of mine supply in 2011
  • Congress eyeing 18 trillion we have stashed away in 401ks .... lol, did you think it was only Greece and Portugal!?
  • As if flying drones weren't already scary looking enough, now we have a new hovering eye in the sky with a name as imposing as its science-fictiony looks. The HoverMast is an autonomous hovering platform developed by Sky Sapience and designed to aid in rapid, mobile intelligence gathering. Tethered to a vehicle, the HoverMast can ascend to 160 feet in about 10 seconds and quickly offer information on the surrounding terrain via a wideband data link (the same link provides the device with power). No, this isn't a scan from the pages of Heavy Metal. Yes, this floating cyclops is "the future" of surveillance that is happening right now.
  • 0 digg 16 Share As if flying drones weren't already scary looking enough, now we have a new hovering eye in the sky with a name as imposing as its science-fictiony looks. The HoverMast is an autonomous hovering platform developed by Sky Sapience and designed to aid in rapid, mobile intelligence gathering. Tethered to a vehicle, the HoverMast can ascend to 160 feet in about 10 seconds and quickly offer information on the surrounding terrain via a wideband data link (the same link provides the device with power). No, this isn't a scan from the pages of Heavy Metal. Yes, this floating cyclops is "the future" of surveillance that is happening right now.
  • he recent plummet of the natural gas spot price to a 28-month low has stirred discussion about implications for renewable energy—the majority electrical generating component in RMI’s vision of the 2050 U.S. energy economy. Since mid-2009, it has been increasingly clear that the amount of natural gas supplied via hydraulic fracturing (popularly known as “fracking”) will create an oversupplied domestic natural gas market. The resulting low gas prices depress contract pricing for long-term power sales to utilities. This situation poses significant challenges for new, utility-scale renewable power projects, which must secure contracts with attractive fixed prices to obtain financing.
  • nice cover-up piece.. baltic dry index is down more that 50%, why ? because ! there is a 13% increase in shipping tonnage look over here.. employment figures !!!! ooooh
  • Next time you want to compare anything with hitler, this is how to do it.
  • but even more interestingly: In 2009 TV show Zembla reported that these empty shell corporations pump 8,000 billion euro through the Netherlands, ten percent of all trade in the world.
  • game night
  • Over the long run, the world's economy has grown,... ...on average, a fractional percent per year reaching about 2% annually this century, when the bulk of what we see on earth today was built. That means that each year, on average, the economic system produces 2% more stuff than was produced in the previous 12 months. Beneath the frantic ups and downs of daily commerce, a persistent, invisible swell pushes the entire econosphere forward, slowly thickening the surface of the earth with more things, more interactions, and more opportunities. And that tide is accelerating, expanding a little faster each year. At the genesis of civilization, the earth was mostly Darwin's realm--all biosphere, no economy. Today the econosphere is huge beyond comprehension. If we add up the total replacement costs of all the roads in every country in the world, all the railways, vehicles, telephone lines, power plants, schools, houses, airports, bridges, shopping centers (and everything inside them), factories, docks, harbors--if we add up all the gizmos and things humans have made all over the planet, and calculate how much it is all worth, as if it were owned by a company, we come up with a huge amount of wealth accumulated over centuries by this slow growth. In 1998 dollars, the global infrastructure is worth approximately 4 quadrillion dollars. That's a 4 with 15 zeros. That's a lot of pennies from nothing. What is the origin of this wealth? Ten thousand years ago there was almost none. Now there is 4 quadrillion dollars worth. Where did all of it come from? And how? The expenditure of energy needed to create this fluorescence is not sufficient to explain it since animals expend vast quantities of energy without the same result. Something else is at work. "Humans on average build a bit more than they destroy, and create a bit more than they use up," writes economist Julian Simon. That's about right, but what enables humans, on average, to ratchet up such significant accumulations?
  • just bloody amazing...
  • Chemtrails. These guys are pitiable loons, but they're interesting harbingers of a future when even scientific illiterates are deathly afraid of the sky. It's interesting that we have cults of people who walk outside and read the sky like a teacup. I've got a soft spot for chemtrail people, they're really just sort of cool, and much more interesting than UFO cultists, who are all basically Christians. Jesus is always the number one Saucer Brother in UFO contactee cults. It's incredible how little imagination the saucer people have.
XML
Stats & Atts.

It's even worse than it appears.