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  • Vast new cities of apartments and shops are being built across China at a rate of ten a year, but they remain almost completely uninhabited ghost towns. It's all part of the government's efforts to keep the economy booming, and there are many people who would love to move in, but it's simply too expensive for most. Video journalist Adrian Brown wanders through malls of vacant shops, and roads lined with empty apartment buildings... 64 million apartments are said to be empty across the country and one of the few shop owners says he once didn't sell anything for four or five days.
  • Authorities in Northern Ireland on Saturday defused a bomb packed into a bin containing 500 pounds of homemade explosives, police said.
  • A shooter with an automatic weapon opened fire in a shopping mall in the Dutch town of Alphen aan den Rijn, killing six and wounding 10 before taking his own life. It's the second shooting in as many weeks in the town of 70,000 (two were killed on April 2), though it's unclear if the incidents were connected; the gunman in today's massacre was apparently shooting indiscriminately. He hasn't been identified, though he is apparently "known to police."
  • As police try to unravel the case of a suspected serial killer in Long Island, they've found their work hampered by the killer's unusual savviness. The killer seems so well-versed in police techniques that some are wondering if he or she is in law enforcement. -- (or really good at tv)
  • Loss of consciousness and death would soon follow purely from oxygen deprivation to the brain...At the same time, temperatures of -70 degrees Fahrenheit (-57 degrees Celsius) - made even colder by the chill of 500 mile-per-hour (805 kilometer-per-hour) winds - would lead to rapid freezing, beginning with the skin, eyes, and other surface tissues. In response to such extreme stress, your nervous system would go haywire, leading to potentially fatal spikes in blood pressure and heart rate.
  • If you live in Hawaii, California, British Columbia, Alaska or Baja California, here are some bad news: According to computer models made by scientists at the International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa, all the debris washed out by the Japan tsunami is coming your way.
  • In what is either a medical first or the best "sorry I gave you an STD, babe" defense of all time, an American biologist has passed the rare Zika virusâ��received via mosquito biteâ��to his wife through sex.
  • The APMI XM395 cartridge employs a standard 120-millimeter projectile body, but packed in the nose is a GPS receiver and controller that ensures the aerodynamic directional fins guide the shell toward the target. It also contains a multi-functional fuse that can be programmed to detonate upon impact, in the air, or after it penetrates the ground or a structure. Coordinates are dialed into the round using a computer.
  • America's favorite fighter jet Charlie Sheen, apparently realizing he is sitting on a hypothetical goldmine of branded paraphernalia, is attempting to trademark 22 of the phrases he's coined during his latest manic episode, including: Vatican Assassin (the Pope doesn't have this one locked down already?) Tiger Blood Rock Star From Mars I'm Not Bi-Polar, I'm Bi-Winning Duh, Winning Adonis DNA Sober Valley Lodge Sheen's Goddesses Violent Torpedo of Truth Defeat Is Not an Option Guess he will be "Duh, Winning®â�¢" a lot of copyright suits! Right?
  • Twice, upon receiving authorization to fly below 500 feet along the shoreline, the pilot replied, "Roger," but stretched it out and pronounced it, "rod-jaaah," according to the recording. He also told the controller, who was nearby at Kennedy Airport monitoring outgoing flights, "Just let us know if we're up in your grill, you know?"
  • "But what is shocking to me is the calmness with which the line is delivered and how outside of specialist reporting such statements are seldom to be heard." - Calm because they are lying?
  • The Twittersphere is exploding over news of Glenn Beck's "transition" away from his daily Fox News program later this year.
  • Ever since Larry King departed CNN, the talk show legend has had a hard time finding things to fill his timeâ��which is probably why he (and wife Shawn) agreed to shill for BreathGemz in this classically cheesy infomercial.
  • Ever since Larry King departed CNN, the talk show legend has had a hard time finding things to fill his timeâ��which is probably why he (and wife Shawn) agreed to shill for BreathGemz in this classically cheesy infomercial.
  • Ever since Larry King departed CNN, the talk show legend has had a hard time finding things to fill his timeâ��which is probably why he (and wife Shawn) agreed to shill for BreathGemz in this classically cheesy infomercial.
  • You can tell that a war zone has really gotten out of control when Geraldo Rivera shows upâ��and that's exactly what just happened in Libya. On tonight's Daily Show, Jon Stewart examinedâ��and heartily mockedâ��Rivera's role in the conflict.
  • Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo private spaceliner flies over San Francisco's Bay Area Bridge with the city as a backdrop while en route to San Francisco International Airport with the Virgin America aircraft "My Other Ride is a Spaceship" to open a new terminal at San Francisco International Airport on April 6, 2011.
  • More than 100 South Korean schools have cancelled or shortened classes over fears that rain falling across the country may include radiation from Japan's stricken nuclear plant.
  • Nearly a month after a 9.0 magnitude earthquake generated the tsunami along Japan's northeastern coast, more than 14,700 people are still missing, officials said Thursday. Many of those may have been washed out to sea and will never be found.
  • Look, we like the iPad just as much as the next person, but that doesn't mean we're going to go around licking it -- in public, anyway. Raoul Martinez, a localÂ�Fox news anchor in San Diego, pulled off one of the funnier April Fool's Day stunts we saw this year. Using an iPad app from Shock Top â�� the popular beer â�� Martinez managed to trick his co-anchor Shally Zomorodi into licking her iPad. Shock Top's application promises that you can "smell" or "taste" the "satisfying flavor and aroma of Shock Top, a Belgian style wheat ale brewed with citrus peels and coriander spice." Zomorodi fell for the prank â�� on air. Hit the jump for the video. Oh, and Shally, if you're reading this, do the snozberries taste like snozberries?
  • Canada's power grid will need an annual investment of $15 billion for the next 20 years in order to maintain aging facilities and meet rising demand, according to a report released Thursday.
  • Former Congressman Curt Weldon traveled repeatedly to Libya during the last decade, becoming so close with the Gadhafi regime that the firm Weldon worked for even floated the idea of selling arms to Tripoli. So now that Gadhafi is under assault from NATO airstrikes and rebel ground troops, it should come as no surprise that Weldon is back in Libya, "to try to help negotiate a political settlement with Gadhafi and family," according to CNN.
  • Highly radioactive water was leaking into the sea Saturday from a crack discovered at a Japanese nuclear power plant destabilized by last month's earthquake and tsunami, Japanese nuclear safety officials say.
  • Highly radioactive water was leaking into the sea Saturday from a crack discovered at a Japanese nuclear power plant destabilized by last month's earthquake and tsunami, Japanese nuclear safety officials say.
  • They got the ranting. It just wasn't funny.
  • MONTREAL - Tugboats took about five minutes to pull free a massive cargo ship that had been grounded at a skewed angle in the St. Lawrence Seaway on Thursday, shutting it down for several hours. Two tugs went into action around 1:15 p.m. after Transport Canada and St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. officials had inspected the Liberian-registered BBC Steinhoelft.
  • The FTC announced today that Google has settled with the commission over the "Buzz" privacy debacle — agreeing to 20 years of privacy audits. The commission said in a statement that this is the first time an FTC settlement order has required a company to implement a comprehensive program to protect the privacy of consumers' information.
  • With a war taking place along the Libyan coast, the newest ships the U.S. Navy has for coastline warfare are maxing and relaxing. One of the new Littoral Combat Ships, the U.S.S. Freedom, is sitting in port at San Diego, while the other, the U.S.S. Independence, is continuing its long maiden voyage to the same port, where it'll also sit out the war. How come?
  • The U.S. military likes to be a little sneaky with its robotic space planes. Unlike typical spacecraft, these vehicles can shift their orbits, frustrating the global network of skywatchers who keep track of just about every man-made object rotating the planet. But the sleuths have their tricks, too. They've tracked down the X-37B on its second secret mission. And the information the skywatchers are finding says quite a bit about the classified operations of this mysterious spacecraft.
  • Remember that time Top Gear gave the Tesla Roadster such a thrashing it broke, except it really didn't break? Tesla does, and it's now filed suit against the BBC and Top Gear accusing the Beeb of defamation.
  • Attention, data nerds! Numbers from the 2010 Census are being released, which means it's time to start crunching numbers and making colorful maps. New Geography has a bunch, including these two showing the concentrations of black and Hispanic respondents, respectively. Multiply the numbers in the legend by 100 to get the population percentages.
  • The US Marines' AV-8B Harriers are now flying over Libya, along with F-15s, F-16s, F-18s, Rafales, Mirages, Typhoons, Tornados, and apparently Spectres and Warthogs too. The Harriers are out of range from their motherships' radio towers—in this case, the USS Kearsarge, now sailing the Mediterranean sea—so they took helium balloons, hooked them to a Lofted Communications System, and made them fly.
  • Revolutions build over long periods — to critical mass, a flash point. Then they ignite suddenly, unpredictably. Like Egypt, started on a young Google executive's Facebook page. Then it goes viral, raging uncontrollably. Can't be stopped. Here in America the set-up is our nation's pervasive "Super-Rich Delusion."
  • A hole in a US Airways jet that landed in Charlotte, North Carolina, was caused by a bullet that pierced the passenger cabin, three government sources told CNN Tuesday.
  • Aircraft condensation trails criss-crossing the sky may be warming the the planet on a normal day more than the carbon dioxide by all planes since the Wright Brothers' first flight in 1903.
  • Last month, Belgians took off their clothes and some members of parliament stopped boning to celebrate tying Iraq's world record for days without a government, at 249 days. Today marks 289 days of bickering with no results, and Belgium still doesn't have a government! At this point they might as well go for it and just dominate the record.
  • A US Airways 737 pilot in Charlotte, North Carolina, discovered a small hole in the exterior of his plane's fuselage Monday, prompting the airline to take the plane out of service and for the FBI to begin an investigation. "During a pre-flight inspection, one of our captains noticed a small hole in the fuselage," said US Airways spokeswoman Valerie Wunder.
  • If you're not familiar with these shrill=voiced harpies, you can catch them on HLN every night from 7 PM until your sensory organs construct a bear trap with which to destroy your miserable head. The first hour is captained by Jane Velez-Mitchell and her show, "Issues," before the giant wig-equipped southern fried femalien Nancy Grace takes to the set. It's a good few hours of societal rage, touching on tabloid celebrity dysfunction, but mainly a stage for the women to highlight horrific violence perpetrated against women and children. We're talking about the greatest hits from the Florida panhandle and the Carolinas; pedophiles on the run, parents figuring out new ways to get rid of innocent kids, rapists, drug addicts, exploding meth labs.
  • According to the commission´s report, the proposal aims to create a single European "transport area" wherein conventional, emission-spewing motor vehicles are phased out and replaced with clean-running cars, all while boosting infrastructure to cater to more sustainable forms of transportation across the continent.
  • Here's some evidence that times may be changing when it comes to farm subsidies: A newspaper story out of Kansas last week reports on a Republican House member who represents western and central Kansas and says that farm subsidies may be difficult to justify sparing from cuts. "Farmers are going to have to make the argument, to Head Start folks and others, that their subsidies are worth borrowing 42 cents for every dollar spent," Rep. Tim Huelskamp said at a town hall meeting last week.
  • It has long been suspected that kids with ADHD might be having some sort of reaction to common synthetic food dyes — but now the FDA is going to formally consider any links between the dyes and hyperactivity in children, including over 30 different studies on the topic.
  • Assholes call me at 8:34 p.m. and start asking me questions, waking me up from a nap. Like they'll get my vote. The only time I'm voting again for them is when I can vote Obama out of office.
  • The radioactivity in water in one unit of a stricken nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan has tested 10 million times higher than normal, the plant's operator said Sunday. Leaked water in Unit 2 of the Fukushima Daiichi plant measured 10 million times higher than usual radioactivity levels when the reactor is operating normally, Tokyo Electric Power Co. spokesman Takashi Kurita told reporters in Tokyo.
  • The Taliban say they have kidnapped 50 Afghan policemen in the northeast of the country. Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid said Sunday that the policemen, who were from Nuristan province, had just finished their training to join the Afghan National Police.
  • Takashi Kurita, a spokesman for the Tokyo Electric Power Co. had said the readings showed water testing 10 million times higher in radioactivity than normal in the cooling system of the reactor in northeastern Japan. On Sunday night, though, plant operators said while the water was contaminated with radiation, they insisted they had made a mistake in the measurement.
  • Former Newfoundland and Labrador premier Danny Williams won't be fighting federal Conservatives this election as he tussles with the new leadership of his provincial Tory party. Williams is skipping his own tribute dinner next weekend, saying his hand-picked successor Premier Kathy Dunderdale has shunned him.
  • Every once in a while, President Obama has to explain to the nation why he's doing stuff. He doesn't want to do it, because you guys annoy him, and you don't want to listen to it, because Dancing With the Stars is on. But this is how democracy works! And we are currently dropping bombs on Libya, a country (?) in Africa (?), and it is important that you know why we are doing such a thing, because otherwise George Will or someone will whine forever and ever, and also, your tax dollars something something.
  • After losing a confidence vote Friday, Harper will cross the street from his home at 24 Sussex Dr. and walk through the grounds of Rideau Hall to meet Gov. Gen. David Johnston at 9 a.m. ET. There, they'll make it official: Canada's 40th Parliament is over, and Canadians are starting election season. (4th federal election in 7 years)
  • A Beijing entrepreneur, discussing restaurant choices with his fiancée over their cellphones last week, quoted Queen Gertrude's response to Hamlet: "The lady doth protest too much, methinks." The second time he said the word "protest," her phone cut off. He spoke English, but another caller, repeating the same phrase on Monday in Chinese over a different phone, was also cut off in midsentence.
  • Colorado and Oregon have joined several other Western states in reporting trace amounts of radioactive particles that have likely drifted about 5,000 miles from a quake and tsunami-damaged nuclear power plant in Japan, officials say.
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